Glossary Of Data Terms For Driver Retention Survey Platforms

The ability to capture and effectively analyze retention data is necessary in order to identify specific causes of truck driver turnover. Our carrier clients who utilize the Stay Ahead platform of surveys have a wealth of data available to them. The glossary below provides key terminology utilized by Stay Metrics as a preview for those considering a partnership with us.

Learn more by reading about our visualizations. Additional sections will be added to provide more in-depth knowledge!

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Visualizations

The Client Portal is an online platform where Stay Metrics clients can access the interventions platform and the reporting platform. As Stay Metrics continues to innovate, this will be the primary channel for clients to access these innovations and put them to work.

The Interventions Platform provides Stay Metrics clients information about drivers who may be at risk of leaving. Information on the platform is based on driver responses to the First Impressions survey and Early Experience survey. Drivers who, for example, provide a high percentage of negative responses on either of the surveys would be flagged in the Interventions Platform. Drivers’ survey responses and contact information are available so clients can quickly intervene with these at-risk drivers. Clients can also change the status of each intervention opportunity and add notes to capture details of the situation.

The interventions dashboard gives you quick insights into drivers who may be at risk of leaving.

The Reporting Platform is an easy to access and interactive data visualization tool where Stay Metrics clients can see data from their surveys. Data are presented in many creative ways so clients can gain insights and make decisions about quality improvement initiatives. Filters allow clients to drill down into various subgroups of the data, and the interactive nature of the tool allows clients to ‘click’ different elements of the graphs for additional viewpoints. The reporting platform is powered by a Microsoft tool called Power BI.

This is a sample of the Executive Summary Dashboard, which is one of many visualizations that are a part of the Reporting Platform.

There are two types of bar charts. A horizontal bar chart uses bars to represent frequencies or percentages for several variables or categories of a variable. Sometimes the bars are stacked so that each bar is divided into categories that all add to 100%. For an example of a bar chart that is stacked see the vertical bar chart example below. A horizontal bar chart that is stacked would look the same, except the bars would be horizontal.

Example:
This horizontal bar chart shows the number (frequency) of drivers who chose each of the different responses to the question “Which of the following factors impacted your decision to choose this company over others when you first applied?” The response options are represented by the bars and are labeled along the vertical axis. The number at the end of each bar represents the actual frequencies, and a number line is provided along the horizontal axis.

A vertical bar chart uses vertical bars to represent frequencies or percentages for several variables or categories of a variable. Sometimes the bars are stacked so that each bar is divided into categories that all add to 100%. In the example of a vertical bar chart, the bars are stacked.

Example:
In this example of a vertical bar chart, each bar on the chart represents a different item on the survey. The bars are ‘stacked’ so that each includes 100% of the responses for the item represented. The red portion of the bar represents the percent of drivers who gave negative responses (strongly disagree or disagree), the yellow represents the percent of drivers who gave neutral responses, and the green represents the percent of drivers who gave positive responses (agree or strongly agree). The black dot on the chart is the mean score across all drivers who responded to that item. The vertical axis on the left-hand side shows the range of percentages, while the vertical axis on the right-hand side shows the range for the mean score.

A box chart presents the percent of the data that fall into each of two or more categories. The chart itself is box-shaped with smaller boxes inset. The sizes of the inset boxes relative to one another represent their relative percentages.

Example:
This box chart represents how responses are broken down across divisions.

A donut chart presents the percent of the data that falls into each of two or more categories. The chart itself looks like a donut with each category being represented by a piece of that donut. It is a variation of a pie chart, and has become more and more popular in recent years. Its advantage over a pie chart is that it does not rely on angles (the inside of the pie slices); people can have a difficult time judging differences between angles. Also, a donut chart can include multiple “rings” to represent several variables in a single chart.

Example:
This example shows the proportion of drivers who responded to the question “I would return to this company if they could change the things I did not like.”