Recipe for Retention: Describing a Carrier Accurately During Recruiting

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Truck driver on the left. Recipe book on the right which lists retention and has 1 ingredient: accurately describe your carrier.

We recently ran a research report that identified the Top 5 Areas to Watch for New-to-You Drivers. To help you respond, we are publishing a 5-part series of blogs that share strategies to help you improve in each of these areas. Today, we tackle how you can help your recruiters describe what it is like to drive for your carrier accurately.

At first glance, the solution to this issue is simple. Just tell people what it’s like. How hard can that be?

The truth, though, is that giving a good, comprehensive overview of what the day-to-day of driving for a carrier is like can be challenging.

But there’s hope! A few simple practices can help your recruiters describe your company better so that drivers’ expectations are closer to reality.

Perfect Your “Elevator Pitch”

Elevator symbol

Entrepreneurs and salespeople will be familiar with the “elevator pitch” concept. The phrase refers to the time it takes to give the whole pitch, roughly 30-60 seconds (the average time of an elevator conversation).

You might be thinking, “There’s no way I could accurately describe my company that quickly!” Given some time and thought, though, you might be surprised.

The more you think about what you are trying to say, the shorter you can make the “pitch.” Going over it several times will naturally allow you to discover exactly what is important and what is not.

Trust your intuition on this one. Do you find yourself saying something that is far too obvious? Is one aspect of your “pitch” not true of everyone?

Asking these types of questions and practicing their “elevator pitch” can help your recruiters zero in on what’s most important about your carrier. They can, then, speak clearly and concisely with potential drivers.

Ask Drivers for Help

Who at your carrier knows most about what it is like to drive for you? Drivers, of course!

Consider asking them to help your recruiters describe your carrier better. One way to solicit this feedback would be to send an anonymous survey out to a cross-section of drivers (some new, some old, across demographics). Ask them something simple like “How would you describe what it’s like driving with us to a fellow driver?” You can also get feedback like this through a driver focus group, or your recruiters can reach out to current drivers directly to get their feedback. You can find other helpful ideas in a recent blog from DriverReach.

Your recruiters need to hear and read “stories” from your drivers so they can internalize their voices. As a result, your recruiters equip themselves to tell these stories to potential drivers.

Keep in mind that this work isn’t effective unless you keep it up-to-date. In a fast-evolving industry, what drivers said two years ago may not reflect today’s working conditions at all. Decide how often you would like to refresh your “story” data and keep at it for the best results.

Conclusion

As you can see, good disciplines and feedback mechanisms can help keep your recruiting process accurate and, thus, effective. Communication is a challenge for everyone, including recruiters; but practice and good information can make any recruiter better at bringing on drivers that stay.

I hope this blog has been helpful to you in addressing one of the top five areas most correlated with turnover within 90 days. Part 2 of this series will cover how to help recruiters accurately describe settlements to new recruits.

You can read our full report on the Top 5 Areas to Watch for New-to-You Drivers by filling out a short form.

Read the Report